16.10.08 by Jeff

Gemma Booth

Some really fun photography from Gemma Booth. Apparently fashion photography doesn’t always have to include a bunch of naked girls! It must be pretty tough for Booth to take a bad picture when her shoots are so fantastically art-directed and brilliantly styled. Love the series with the little robot!

boooooom photography photographer gemma booth blog vancouver

boooooom photography photographer gemma booth blog vancouver

boooooom photography photographer gemma booth blog vancouver

boooooom photography photographer fashion gemma booth blog vancouver

boooooom photography photographer gemma fashion booth blog vancouver

boooooom photography photographer fashion gemma booth blog vancouver

boooooom photography photographer fashion gemma booth blog vancouver

boooooom photography photographer fashion gemma booth blog vancouver

boooooom photography photographer fashion gemma booth blog vancouver

boooooom photography photographer fashion gemma booth blog vancouver

This work is a breath of fresh air! See more of Gemma Booth’s work here:

http://www.gemmabooth.com

And get familiar with her blog here:

http://gemmabooth.blogspot.com/













Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • Word up man! Great photographic series, and “We don’t have to take our… clothes off, to have a good time… no no” I just thought of that song to your comment. True indeed, creativity far outweighs T&A.

    Oh, and if those are BOOOOOOOM Stickers gimme some. I gotta come up yo!

    peace.

  • LOve the robot photos!

  • brilliant set! great tones and i agree the robot series is awesome.

  • GO gemmas!

  • haha Gemmas! it’s been a good week for Gemmas.

  • Pingback: You blog like a girl » links for 2008-10-20 | Nina from the block, yo.()

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  • niiice !!! wonderful use of costumes 😀 I love this kind of photography

  • emily rugburn

    oh my god! increadible…..
    I fricken love this girl!

  • Gemma takes the good stuff and leaves all the the crap behind!

  • wow. Ive seen her images around, but never knew who the photographer was. Thanks for this!!

    • i love when that happens! i often see cool images on ffffound and eventually stumble upon the creator of the image

  • Shelly

    the photos of the girls with their hair over their face then the next one with it flicked up- is fun.

  • Isa

    Love it!

    I wish I had a little robot pal.

  • Pingback: Gemma Booth « Pimba()

  • Frankie

    WOW, what filters do you use on your cameras? and if it’s not a filter, what effect is it? i LOVE the colours, it’s so lovely.

  • Obsessed with the first image!!!

    Check out our SS 2012 Lookbook and repost if you’d like.
    I think you’ll LOVE our bags! http://stela9.blogspot.com/2011/12/stela-9-ss-2012-lookbook.html

  • I’m obsessed with first image!!!

    Check out our SS 2012 Lookbook and repost if you’d like. I think you’ll LOVE our bags! http://stela9.blogspot.com/2011/12/stela-9-ss-2012-lookbook.html





23.08.16 by Jeff

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A selection of work by Danish illustrator Rune Fisker. More images below.

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A selection of work by South Korean illustrator Jee-ook Choi. More images below.

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Artist Spotlight: Jordan Kasey

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Illustrations by So PineNut (click here for previous post). More images below.

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Experimental Artist Petros Vrellis Creates Detailed Portraits With A Single Thread

 

Born in Greece, with a background in Electrical Engineering as well as Art Science, artist Petros Vrellis has a passion for creating interactive installations that blend art and technology. His latest project is a mesmerizing re-imagining of traditional handicraft.

Using a 28″ aluminum-rimmed loom, Petros runs a single thread from one anchor peg to another to create just the right density and darkening at precise intersections. The end result is a detailed image that emerges from 3000 – 4000 continuous loops (or 1-2 kilometers of thread)!

While Petros is following a set pattern developed from a computer-generated algorithm, as you can see in the time-lapsed video above, the step-by-step process is all done by hand. We had the chance to speak with Petros about his experimental process and why hand-made work still has a place in the digital age. Check out the full interview below!

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