07.01.09 by Jeff

Camera phone photo contest!

RVCA + Color Magazine + Timebomb Trading present: “This is My Life” a camera phone photography contest! Take photos with your cell phone during your day and create a 12-frame (one per hour) contact sheet. The most interesting day wins a clothing package from RVCA valued at $500! Second and third place wins a one-year subscription with Color Magazine.

rvca color magazine timebomb trading

Since the image is so small I’ve copied out all the instructions below:

How To Make a Contact Sheet in Photoshop…

1. Dump 12 of your camera phone photos into a folder.
2. Open Photoshop.
3. Go to the File menu.
4. Select Automate.
5. Select Contact Sheet II.
6. Select the folder that your camera phone
images are in.
7. Set your document to the following:

– 11” wide and 8.5” long
– 125 DPI
– 4 columns wide and 3 rows high
– No file names

8. Hit OK. Let Photoshop do its thing.
9. Save the document as a JPEG.
10. Email your entry over!

E-mail your contact sheet jpeg to contest@colormagazine.ca

Contest closes January 15, 2009
All entries become the property of Color Magazine and may be used in future online and print materials.













Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • something was funny looking at that poster and the rules. then realized contact sheet in the poster has 16 in it. cool contest tho!

  • haha i did the EXACT same thing! i hit the automate button and went through the steps twice and then realised afterwards

  • kind of fun! hehehehehe i think i’ll join

  • Yreka

    The problem would be knowing how to do this without Photoshop.

    Anyone want to give me a quick run-through on how to do it in GIMP? I’d use Fireworks, but I need to re-install it and don’t know where the CD’s gone off to.

  • Cool to submit for centralamericans?

  • jen

    if you do not have photoshop, you can lay out the images into an 11 x 8.5 document and arrange the images into a grid that is 4 columns wide and 3 rows high. so long as you can submit it as a jpeg.

  • Jess

    i’d really like to take part but am based in London – is the competition open here?

  • you and Manuel should either email color magazine (the email provided) and ask or just go ahead and do it!

  • this contest is open worldwide.

    thanks for your interested, can’t wait to see your entries.
    cheers.

  • Amy

    can we subtitle the pics?

  • my pictures are not in chronological order on the sheet…will this be a problem?

  • amy – i would guess that they dont want subtitles

    tara – i dont think that’s a big deal although i think you could easily remedy that by numbering the photos in the folder.





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