12.03.09 by Jeff

The process of photo-weaving!

A fascinating little time-lapse of Todd M. Duym weaving two identical photos of a rose, together. The whole process took 20 hours. Definitely want to see that finished piece in person!













Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • thats really interesting! incredible work

  • yea i like seeing the work that goes into something like this.

    hows is your work going?

  • That’s pretty amazing!

  • Lovely todd!

  • Jeremy Mouton

    What kind of material is that? First time I’ve seen this done, is it common?

  • That’s such an awesome idea! I bet that’s beautiful in person…

  • Hey Jeff,

    work is going well. I’ve never been in shows before and I have been in one, donated work for AIDs Foundation, and have two shows coming up. Nothing solo but incredible that I get a chance to show at all.

    Oh and I started sewing…….i’ll keep you updated :)

    Thanks again.

  • thanks everyone for the positive feedback…

    What kind of material is that?

    it’s two lightjet prints. one glossy and one matte. i don’t think it’s common. i’ve heard of people sort of the same thing but i haven’t seen anything in person or online…

    • Caroline

      hey, i’ve just stumbled across your work and it’s really good :)

      I’m in first year uni and i’m doing something like this for my final exam. Except, instead of using two of the same photos and weaving them together, i’m using two different faces. At the moment i use my mums and my dads faces. Weaving them together and they create a new face :) It looks pretty cool. For my final piece i’ve completed 7 a4 weaves but they’re not all the same, they’re a progression from one face to the other, so by changing the width and spacing of the strips i’ve managed to make one face appear more than the other and vice versa. Takes forever huh?!

      • sounds cool! email me when there’s something to see!

  • Betty

    That shit is dope!!!

  • ben

    Waow ! How can he move so fast ! ;-)

  • amazing

  • Julia

    That is awesome! How did you get each photo cut up into perfectly straight lines? Did you use a big paper cutter or did you just exacto them?

  • desert-rose

    thank you….

    todd

  • julia

    i used a professional matte cutter…

    todd

  • Pingback: …Todd Duym is a magical weaver? at Didnt You Hear…()

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