22.06.09 by Jeff

Martin Wilson

Martin Wilson painstakingly shoots rolls of 35mm film in sequence so that when the strips are laid out in the contact sheet larger images appear. No cheating in Photoshop, if he makes a mistake, he starts over.

martin wilson photographer photography contact sheet film 35mm

martin wilson photographer photography contact sheet film 35mm

martin wilson photographer photography contact sheet film 35mm

martin wilson photographer photography contact sheet film 35mm













Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • brodie

    brilliant!

  • Except that the first image is 99 frames, just under 3 rolls? Even bulk loaded, and hand developed, this is not done manually in camera, sorry. and the 3rd is 108 images, so he is not shooting entire rolls to get the image. Still impressive.

    • how do you come to the conclusion that it’s not done in camera? i don’t know enough about photography perhaps

    • Hi Wayne, your counting is quite correct. I do try to use the whole film whenever I can, however sometimes I just can’t get the image to work this way. I tried the spiral with various iterations but the best shape seemed to come if I just didn’t use the last few frames in the roll. One Hundred also has a few unused frames. I do feel it is somehow less pure when I don’t use the whole roll, but in the end, if the image looks best that way, that’s what I do.

      I plan them out on paper first, then compose them all in the camera to match my sketch. I does take ages, and I admit that I do waste a lot of film in mistakes!

      all the best
      Martin

      • Yvette

        This is so beautiful martin! Also, I think that electing not to use every exposure in the roll is a pretty damn analog method of shaping the image, and if anything adds to your process. Love your work 😀

  • Oh! it’s so great that you posted these! I saw a print of the Eiffel Tower in a tiny little gallery in London, but it was closed and I never found out the artists name.

    How fortuitous.

  • Amazing!

  • wow, this is awesome. such persistence!

  • oscar

    now that is just stupid 🙂

  • darn – i’d like to try this sometime…

  • wow, these are amazing, just had a why on earth didn’t i think of that moment! I love them

  • Wow this is genius! I love contact sheets anyway, they always tell a story – but he’s just taken that idea and pushed it further.

    I disagree with Wayne though – even if he doesn’t use the full roll of film it doesn’t make it any less amazing. So he didn’t use the last few shots on the roll, that doesn’t mean anything.I’ve just been looking at his website and he says he does the final piecing it together in Photoshop but alters nothing else. And if you look at the details on the website the numbers on the film strip are consecutive.

    • yea i still don’t understand how he jumped to his conclusion

  • Kim

    Oh wow, they are awesome!

  • awesome! one step forward to photography…

  • Pingback: Cool sequential 35mm film photo art from Martin Wilson()

  • this is absolutely incredible

  • Pingback: what consumes me, bud caddell » Martin Wilson - BOOOOOOOM! - CREATE * INSPIRE * COMMUNITY * ART * DESIGN * MUSIC * FILM * PHOTO * PROJECTS()

  • wow! im speechless! amazing work there!

  • C J Archer

    Dear Martin
    We saw your message to the bears at the Royal Academy and loved it. We have bought it as a surprise for my son’s 21st and look forward to collecting from you. Can you tell us where the original was framed as we thought it was perfect for the photo?

    We look forward to hopefully meeting you as we often go to Northwood, I lived in Stanmore and my father still lives in Hatch End !

    regards Catherine

  • Pure genius

  • Pingback: PedroStabile.com/blog » Contact art()

  • Amazing stuff martin! I’m inspired to try this out for myself as well! Great stuff! 🙂

  • Pingback: Recordis Photography » Blog Archive » Martin Wilson()

  • spg

    Wow!





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