18.05.10 by Jeff

Meara O’Reilly

Chladni Singing, by Meara O’Reilly. She creates patterns out of salt using her voice! I’m thinking that there must be other people experimenting with this too?

meara oreilly artist chladni singing

Watch the video below!














Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • Rachel

    I’ve seen the use of salt a lot in making sound vibrations visual – usually from synths and stuff. It’s cool to see it done from the human voice and in a more conceptual/artistic format.

  • http://www.lovebrain.net/

    my friend does this with his bass guitar and oil paint. rad.

    • I would love to see the oil paint/guitar combo!

  • this is so amazing, i haven’t seen anything like this before. is this common knowledge?

  • kilgore trout

    trippy stuff.

  • First time for me too, it’s magical!

  • This is pretty cool… wondering if you can achieve a high level of variety with using the same grid underneath?

  • I bet you could get a lot of different stuff, but this piece is so concentrated on those like few of noises. And what’s with the silverware?? I’m intrigued.

    • I know! I was wondering what was up with the silverware also

  • Beautiful, but also misterious in some way. The forms are symmetrical and following a path. I would like to see the how other noises look! :D

  • I tried to draw with snails. They were uncooperative. I’ll have to feed them blackcurrents to make their trails more lively.

  • Pingback: Chladni Singing - today and tomorrow()

  • This gave me the chills.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GtiSCBXbHAg

    This is a video of it being done in a more ‘lablike’ setting. Increasing frequency, the patterns slowly change and morph. There are plenty more related videos as well – some neat stuff!

  • Pingback: (Video) Chladni Singing: Using The Human Voice To Create Physical Patterns - PSFK()

  • Henry Collingham

    It’s a common physics experiment, and all of the maths used for shaping instruments such as violins and bases, that have to be resonant at different frequencies, is derived from this experiment, although it typically is done using a sine wave generator.

    It was pioneered by called Chladni, he used a bow to vibrate the plates.

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