01.11.10 by Jeff

Michael Wolf

“Copy Artist”, brilliant photos by Michael Wolf. Knock-off artists in China pose next to their paintings. I’ll take the Francis Bacon!

china copy artist by photographer photography michael wolf

china copy artist by photographer photography michael wolf

china copy artist by photographer photography michael wolf

china copy artist by photographer photography michael wolf

china copy artist by photographer photography michael wolf

china copy artist by photographer photography michael wolf

china copy artist by photographer photography michael wolf

china copy artist by photographer photography michael wolf













Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • Amazing, love the setting they are
    in. it boosts the contrast so much.

  • agreed, bacon it is

  • Tae

    What’s the name of the second painting?? Is it something about goliath??

    • “Saturn Devouring His Son” by Goya – i still find that image quite terrifying

  • Indeed , awesome concept to shoot. Tragic concept..

  • Very cool idea for a photo collection. All the copies are truly amazing, but you gotta love the one with John Wayne – “East copies West”. Great theme!

  • reminds me of Haibo Yu’s “Dafen Oil Painting Village” project

  • annie

    love this collection. great concept!

  • dom

    fantastic shots! love it!

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  • ok, so random question…aren’t they nervous about getting in trouble for making fake paintings? Isn’t there some international law against that? Might be a stupid question since everything fake comes from China, but just wondering. On the other hand, I’ll take that francis bacon one as well. Pretty damn close to the real thing. The Mona Lisa I think is the least like the real painting. The eyes and smile is a little off. Still amazing! :)

  • Maragon

    I’d already read about the market in reproductions that is flourishing in China – one guy puts out Van Gogh by the yard. The Bierstadt painting was a little garish, where it should have been subtle, and the Mona Lisa looked a little insipid, but some of the other reproductions were quite decent.

  • does anybody knows who the artist is on the first picture?

  • trip

    the mone lisa is ten times its original size i think the ide ais consumerism and reproduction set as sterotyping a spefic race in our world and art is meaningless is consumed by everyone

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  • it is crazzy





22.02.17 by Jeff

Photo of Namib-Naukluft National Park in Namibia Looks Like a Painting

This is not a painting! The image above is a photo by Frank Krahmer (see the image larger). I saw this pop up on Reddit and had to investigate.

The image is from Namib-Naukluft National Park which is part of the Namib Desert (considered the world’s oldest desert according to Wikipedia). I found a similar image on National Geographic which gives you a sense of the scale of the dunes and camel thorn trees. The image below was shot by Frans Lanting.

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22.02.17 by Staff

“Black Drawings” by Artist Michael Aaron Lee

New York City-based artist Michael Aaron Lee covers paper with grease pencil before cutting through with a printmaker’s gouge, uncovering the white underneath. See more images from “Black Drawings” below.

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22.02.17 by Staff

Reader Submission: Jason Parker

A selection of work by artist Jason Parker who participated in this month’s Reader Submissions (click here to submit your work!). More images below.

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22.02.17 by Staff

Book Giveaway: Chromaphilia by Stella Paul

Phaidon is releasing a new book all about colour and art. Written by author and art historian Stella Paul, Chromaphilia invites readers to consider the many ways that colour has been theorized and utilized to express meaning and emotion throughout different time-periods and cultures.

Each chapter of the book covers a specific colour (Red, Blue, Purple, Gold, Yellow, Green, White, Grey and Black), and offers insight, artwork and anecdotes you probably didn’t know. Like how Yves Klein’s obsession with a particular shade of blue led him to develop his own customized (and patented) paint. Or how many crushed bugs it used to take to make the coveted red dye used for royal garments. (The answer is 70,000!)

Check out more images from Chromaphilia below or grab yourself a copy when it’s released on March 13th. We also have one to give away! To snag the book, simply post a link to any Booooooom article in the comment section below and write 1 sentence about the artist’s use of colour.

The winner will be selected in two weeks!

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22.02.17 by Staff

Artist Spotlight: Haley Josephs

Paintings by Seattle-born, New York City-based artist Haley Josephs. See more images below.

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