18.07.11 by Jeff

Ron van der Ende

Sculptures made of reclaimed pieces of wood, by Ron van der Ende.

Sculptures by artist Ron van der Ende made of found scrap wood

Sculptures by artist Ron van der Ende made of found scrap wood

Sculptures by artist Ron van der Ende made of found scrap wood

Sculptures by artist Ron van der Ende made of found scrap wood

Sculptures by artist Ron van der Ende made of found scrap wood

Sculptures by artist Ron van der Ende made of found scrap wood

Sculptures by artist Ron van der Ende made of found scrap wood

Sculptures by artist Ron van der Ende made of found scrap wood

Sculptures by artist Ron van der Ende made of found scrap wood

Sculptures by artist Ron van der Ende made of found scrap wood

Sculptures by artist Ron van der Ende made of found scrap wood

Sculptures by artist Ron van der Ende made of found scrap wood













Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • These are really cool. I bet they’re amazing to see in person!

  • All I have to say is, check out his website too if you have two minds and only one of them has been blown.

  • ooh my, thanks so much for posting this, I’d seen the diamond piece on the net before but never knew who made it :)! great pieces!

  • oof

    saw these at the armory show in new york this year, and they were definitely some of the top things there. so good!

  • Pingback: Ron van der Ende | streams of perpendicular thought.()

  • lapetitefaon

    this guy’s work is epic!

  • Oh. Huge Personality ! I want to watch him when he creates this.

  • Joe Inno

    I enjoy viewing these and knowing they are made of reclaimed wood is even better. Great craftsmanship as well…

  • It is definitely worth checking out this guys website, being able to see larger images of his work really brings the pieces to life. The burning log is incredible. I can’t imagine the amount of time it takes to figure out where each piece of wood should go. I’ve never seen anything like it, it’s genius and I’d love to own one of his sculptures. There are too many amazing pieces to choose a favourite but I must mention the diamond, it’s spot on, you couldn’t fail to know what it was yet when you look more closely, you appreciate the time that’s gone in to get it right. I love the perfectionism of the craft.

  • o m g

  • Joost the Host

    Thes are really breathtaking! I just checked his website and in his bio i read that he studied at willem de kooning academy and i’m going to study there next year! Promising!

  • Pingback: Weekly Roundup #5 – Thomas Karam()





23.08.16 by Jeff

Illustrator Spotlight: Rune Fisker

runefisker17

A selection of work by Danish illustrator Rune Fisker. More images below.

Read More

23.08.16 by Jeff

Illustrator Spotlight: Jee-ook Choi

jee-ook18

A selection of work by South Korean illustrator Jee-ook Choi. More images below.

Read More

23.08.16 by Staff

Artist Spotlight: Jordan Kasey

Kasey6

A selection of paintings by Brooklyn-based artist Jordan Kasey. More images below.

Read More

23.08.16 by Staff

Illustrator Spotlight: So PineNut

sopinenut4

Illustrations by So PineNut (click here for previous post). More images below.

Read More

23.08.16 by Staff

Experimental Artist Petros Vrellis Creates Detailed Portraits With A Single Thread

 

Born in Greece, with a background in Electrical Engineering as well as Art Science, artist Petros Vrellis has a passion for creating interactive installations that blend art and technology. His latest project is a mesmerizing re-imagining of traditional handicraft.

Using a 28″ aluminum-rimmed loom, Petros runs a single thread from one anchor peg to another to create just the right density and darkening at precise intersections. The end result is a detailed image that emerges from 3000 – 4000 continuous loops (or 1-2 kilometers of thread)!

While Petros is following a set pattern developed from a computer-generated algorithm, as you can see in the time-lapsed video above, the step-by-step process is all done by hand. We had the chance to speak with Petros about his experimental process and why hand-made work still has a place in the digital age. Check out the full interview below!

Read More