10.11.11 by Jeff

20 Hz

“20 Hz”, an animation by Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt (Semiconductor). I read the entire description of this video on Vimeo and I still have no idea what I’m looking at!

20 Hz by Semiconductor Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt

Watch the video below!














Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • Sonja

    This is mesmerizing.

  • Rachael

    Semiconductor are favourites of mine. you should really check out their back catalogue. Their work is often shown here in Brighton, UK and watching their work online just doesn’t quite compare to the physical installations.

  • Think of it as visualizations of sound waves that you see when listening to music.. but instead of interpreting music (like through a microphone), they’re reading radio waves from the Earth’s upper atmosphere using data from the CARISMA radio array.

    • its crazy to think these waves exist all around us all the time

      • @Jeff

        Regarding ever-present waves, you might enjoy Nathaniel Rich’s article ‘For Whom The Cell Tolls’ in the May 2010 issue of Harper’s.

      • cool ill look for it!

  • 20 Hz is inaudible to the human ear for the most part. Especially on computer speakers. If you played 20Hz on some really high quality powered subs you would almost hear the heaviest bass to rattle you rump to. If you stood next to those subs your shirt would be shaking and the air would be hot. Infra-sound is a natural phenomenon that generates real low frequencies (around 20 Hz) from atmospheric aberrations close to the ocean surface and lower atmosphere. There are certain places on earth where this can be experienced. You might get a weird creepy sensation that cant be explained on some cold dark skied beach in the northern hemisphere. It sounds like they are basing it off of infrasound, but the sound is not accurate.

  • Tony

    it’s the radiation from a solar storm, the radiation waves have been captured and replicated as audio, as well as in a visual format.

  • Andreas

    Sometimes it looks like that cornflour, water, low, frequence experiment thing. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UU7iuJ98fRQ&feature=related

  • Dan

    I feel like the waves are trying to talk to me

  • henry wilcox

    youre looking at electiricty baby

  • simply beautiful! We have tweeted it!





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