10.09.12 by Jeff

Christine Sun Kim

Deaf sound artist Christine Sun Kim
A beautiful video portrait by The Selby featuring deaf performance artist, Christine Sun Kim. This is from last year but somehow I missed it. Now I am totally inspired to go and explore sound! Watch below!

Read more on Nowness.

 

christinesunkim.com

via: vimeo staff picks













Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • Bonechaos

    This was absolutely mesmerizing. 

  • I was touched by this

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • who cares any more

    i want to show her cymatics.and i want to tell her she is loved.





21.08.17 by Jeff

OPEN CALL: @Booooooom Instagram Feature

photo by Jimmy Marble

 
Heads up, we are currently accepting submissions for features on our @Booooooom Instagram account. This is an open call for photos that fit the theme: ‘A fleeting moment’.

If you have an image that you think fits this theme, leave a comment below with 1 image and a clickable link to your Instagram account.

 

LEAVE A COMMENT / APPLY FOR INSTAGRAM FEATURE

21.08.17 by Staff

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Artist Spotlight: Klone

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ANIGIF Net Artwork by Artist Nicolas Sassoon

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