10.09.12 by Jeff

Christine Sun Kim

Deaf sound artist Christine Sun Kim
A beautiful video portrait by The Selby featuring deaf performance artist, Christine Sun Kim. This is from last year but somehow I missed it. Now I am totally inspired to go and explore sound! Watch below!

Read more on Nowness.

 

christinesunkim.com

via: vimeo staff picks













Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • Bonechaos

    This was absolutely mesmerizing. 

  • I was touched by this

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • lepetitfaon

    I absolutely loved this. Feel it is accurate to describe the ownership of sound belonging to those who have access to it, though find it strange this never occurred to me before, especially considering I work with disabled children. I also never thought of the ramifications for the people who have limited access to sound as a result of this, which I would not have considered if not for this piece (eg asking a child who cannot hear not to drag its feet because its rude, as though the child would understand why that particular sound is offensive). This does exactly what good art should do, directs you to the questions the artist is posing and forces you to think about it, wonderful work!

  • who cares any more

    i want to show her cymatics.and i want to tell her she is loved.





07.12.16 by Staff

Artist Spotlight: Alex Kanevsky

kanevsky1

A selection of paintings by artist Alex Kanevsky (click here for previous posts). More images from “Uncatchable” below.
Read More

07.12.16 by Jeff

Are the Similarities Between Trump and Hitler TIME Covers Purely Coincidental?

trump-hitler-time-cover0

TIME Magazine has just announced their “Person of the Year” is Donald Trump. Twitter users were quick to point out the striking similarities between this cover, shot by photographer Nadav Kander, and the Adolf Hitler cover from April 1941. Hitler was also named “Person of the Year” in 1938.

In both images the subjects are seated in chairs, but as Fader points out, notice the ominous shadow on the wall, and the way the colour of the backdrop complements the suit. For reference you can look through the past “Person of the Year” covers here.

Many are also suggesting that the “M” in TIME gives Donald Trump the appearance of having devil horns. Are people reading too much into this or were these intentional decisions? Have a look at both cover images below.

Read More

07.12.16 by Staff

Artist Spotlight: Kyle Staver

staver1

Paintings from New York City-based artist Kyle Staver’s latest exhibition. Click here for previous post. See more images below.

Read More

07.12.16 by Staff

Photographer Spotlight: Tim Richmond

richmond3

A selection of photos by photographer Tim Richmond (click here for previous post). More images below.

Read More

07.12.16 by Staff

Artist Spotlight: Patrícia Koyšová

koysova9

A selection of paintings by Bratislava, Slovakia-based artist Patrícia Koyšová (click here for previous post). All images photographed by Peter Čintalan, see more below!

Read More