31.03.15 by Jeff

Video of the Day: The World’s First Hyperlapse 16mm Film (1995)

worldsfirsthyperlapse

According to Wikipedia, American filmmaker Dan Eckert coined the term “hyperlapse” in 2012, referring to a method of filmmaking where a camera is aimed at a fixed point while it is moved large distances. Single images are then aligned in post production to produce a fluid motion. The technique however can be traced back to a filmmaker named Guy Roland who invented it in 1986 and utilized it in a Super8 mm film called “Pace” in 1991.

Roland shot the film you see here, “Pacer”, in 1995 using a 16mm Bolex camera, and it’s a thing of beauty. The original negative of this film was apparently destroyed in it’s only printing in 1995, and that print was digitally transferred last year and painstakingly remastered earlier this year (the version that you see below).

A little side note for Vancouverites, Roland began shooting “Spacer” in Vancouver in 2001 using digital cameras (in the painful early days of digital photography) which was released in 2004 and won many awards before the National Film Board of Canada bought it in 2006 and it’s name became “Kino Citius”. The NFB had plans to follow it up with a digital large format film with Roland, but it was eventually cancelled.

Watch “Pacer” (1995) below. It is amazing what our phones can do with the Hyperlapse app now when you consider how much work it was to achieve this effect back then.














Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • not sure who allowed those titles to be added to this film lol

    • Tom Roche

      High school film project style

    • 1995

  • This is the “Guy” I learned hyperlapse from in 2007. When he screened Pacer for me at his apartment I wanted him to share it with the world, but he held back. I’m glad it’s finally released for all to see. I wanted to call his technique Roland Motion, but he declined that idea too. We can all thank Dan for the great term Hyperlapse, which unfortunately gets misused now since Instagram Hyperlapse was released and people simply use it for making timelapse and then tag their videos #hyperlapse.

  • kj

    Don’t think it’s the first. How about Koyaanisqatsi. 1982





24.04.17 by Staff

Intricate Food Carvings by Japanese Artist Gaku

Japanese artist Gaku sculpts elaborate designs into various fruits and vegetables using an x-acto knife. More incredible images below.

Read More

24.04.17 by Jeff

Artist Spotlight: Carson Davis Brown

“Mass” is a project by artist Carson Davis Brown in which he creates sculptures inside of big-box stores and other places of mass. He constructs the unauthorized installations, photographs them, and then leaves them to be discovered by shoppers and staff. Images of the installations are printed, framed (using un-sold frames), and exhibited inside the stores without permission. See more images from the series below as well as video clips documenting the building of installations using cameras tethered to in-store camera displays!

Read More

24.04.17 by Jeff

Artist Spotlight: Jaime Angelopoulos

Sculptures and collages by artist Jaime Angelopoulos. More images below.

Read More

24.04.17 by Jeff

Artist Spotlight: Ayumu Arisaka

A selection of drawings and animations by Ayumu Arisaka. More below!

Read More

24.04.17 by Jeff

Artist Spotlight: Luke Pelletier

A selection of work by artist Luke Pelletier. More images below.

Read More