28.04.10 by Jeff

Huang Qingjun + Ma Hongjie

Family Stuff, photos by Huang Qingjun and Ma Hongjie. Beijing.

Family Stuff by photographers Huang Qingjun & Ma Hongjie

Family Stuff by photographers Huang Qingjun & Ma Hongjie

Family Stuff by photographers Huang Qingjun & Ma Hongjie

Family Stuff by photographers Huang Qingjun & Ma Hongjie

Family Stuff by photographers Huang Qingjun & Ma Hongjie

Family Stuff by photographers Huang Qingjun & Ma Hongjie

Family Stuff by photographers Huang Qingjun & Ma Hongjie

Family Stuff by photographers Huang Qingjun & Ma Hongjie

Family Stuff by photographers Huang Qingjun & Ma Hongjie

Family Stuff by photographers Huang Qingjun & Ma Hongjie

Family Stuff by photographers Huang Qingjun & Ma Hongjie













Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • I love these. Is there a site for them?

  • Man, these are so cool. I would love to see someone living in the Western World do this…let’s just say you’d def need a wide angled lense.

  • Peter Menzel did this in the early 90s with families from all over the world in a book called Material World. It was amazing to see a portrait of an American family with all of their things next to a photo like one of these. He also did a book called Hungry Planet which did the same thing but with food. Love the color palate of these.

  • Pam

    I was thinking the same thing as Dave who commented before me. Imagine how long it would take to put all the items in your home onto your front yard..crazy! These photos are awesome 🙂

  • rod

    These are very interesting photos. I’ve once posted a similar article called “China’s 56 Ethnic Groups” The photos reveal the traditional clothing of the groups in China. Check it out if you fancy http://creativeroots.org/?p=5412

    • Morgan

      those photos are great! what an incredible experience that project must have been!

  • femi

    it reflect the down stairs of china.. it impressed me .
    thanks you
    it is the real china

  • most of them don’t have kids. that is why they don’t need much stuff…

  • did you see the price they charge for the prints?

  • Love the colours of these.

  • these are very nice photos..congrats Huang…

  • Pingback: „show me what you got“ « Beijing()

  • lapetitefaon

    YES! These are so beautiful, I love the colors! And Material World is such a beautiful book, love, love, love. Killer concept, gorgeously illustrated here!

  • Morgan

    awesome. so simple and gorgeous and makes me want to take my roommates hoarded stuff to goodwill

  • these are so so incredible.

  • Pingback: Chinese Consumerism « Leo Burnett()

  • mnp

    Nice

  • Pingback: Family stuff « Dysonology()

  • rhea

    it’s a good idea, altough not a new one. The German Peter Minzel did exactly the same thing, about six years ago. -> http://www.amazon.de/So-lebt-Mensch-Peter-Menzel/dp/3570190633





23.08.16 by Jeff

Illustrator Spotlight: Rune Fisker

runefisker17

A selection of work by Danish illustrator Rune Fisker. More images below.

Read More

23.08.16 by Jeff

Illustrator Spotlight: Jee-ook Choi

jee-ook18

A selection of work by South Korean illustrator Jee-ook Choi. More images below.

Read More

23.08.16 by Staff

Artist Spotlight: Jordan Kasey

Kasey6

A selection of paintings by Brooklyn-based artist Jordan Kasey. More images below.

Read More

23.08.16 by Staff

Illustrator Spotlight: So PineNut

sopinenut4

Illustrations by So PineNut (click here for previous post). More images below.

Read More

23.08.16 by Staff

Experimental Artist Petros Vrellis Creates Detailed Portraits With A Single Thread

 

Born in Greece, with a background in Electrical Engineering as well as Art Science, artist Petros Vrellis has a passion for creating interactive installations that blend art and technology. His latest project is a mesmerizing re-imagining of traditional handicraft.

Using a 28″ aluminum-rimmed loom, Petros runs a single thread from one anchor peg to another to create just the right density and darkening at precise intersections. The end result is a detailed image that emerges from 3000 – 4000 continuous loops (or 1-2 kilometers of thread)!

While Petros is following a set pattern developed from a computer-generated algorithm, as you can see in the time-lapsed video above, the step-by-step process is all done by hand. We had the chance to speak with Petros about his experimental process and why hand-made work still has a place in the digital age. Check out the full interview below!

Read More