17.12.13 by Jeff

Giant Slugs Made of 40,000 Plastic Bags by Dutch Artist Florentijn Hofman

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“Slow Slugs”, sculptures by Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman, ascending the city steps in Angers, France. These two giant molluscs were created using 40,000 plastic bags! See lots more photos below!


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Slow Slugs (2012)

 

florentijnhofman.nl

via: afflante













Jeff
Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.



  • Angie

    Being made of plastic makes them both likable & revolting…just like the ones I find in my yard! I heart this.

  • Nat

    Fun idea! Hey, I always wonder, when I see monumental sculptures like this made out of things like plastic bags, whether the materials have come from the rubbish bins of consumers, or were bought new…everyone assumes the stuff is recycled, but the materials always look so pristine. It would be pretty awful to learn that the bags were bought in the thousands to make these.

    • if the bags are not recycled does it change the content of the piece for you? The notion of using a cheap material that the public eye assumes is recycled seems repulsive however if the bags were bought it mimics the trends of mass consumption, maybe opening an eye to the waste slugs in our very cities. If the peices are made from recycled material he is possibly commenting on turning something potentially devistating into something beautiful… however the nature of the material is still the same. Its plastic, it will not bioderate any time soon. Its equally detrimental, reused or ordered new.

  • Bork

    Your artwork has this singular advantage—an advantage which falls to the lot of no other science which has to do with objects—that, if once it is conducted
    into the sure path of science, by means of this criticism, it can then take in he whole sphere of its cognitions, and can thus complete its work, and
    leave it for the use of posterity, as a capital which can never receive fresh accessions.





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