27.02.09 by Jeff

24k gold fixed gear bicycle!

Aurumania took a page out of the Damien Hirst handbook and built ten 24k gold plated track bikes. If that wasn’t enough they stuck 600 Swarovski crystals on each one. Price tag: $102,418.60 USD. What’s with the rubber tires? They better be made outta some extinct whale blubber or I ain’t buying it!

24k gold swarovski diamond encrusted aurumania track bike fixed gear bicycle

24k gold swarovski diamond encrusted aurumania track bike fixed gear bicycle

24k gold swarovski diamond encrusted aurumania track bike fixed gear bicycle

24k gold swarovski diamond encrusted aurumania track bike fixed gear bicycle

via: ifitshipitshere

Jeff Hamada is the Founder and Editor of Booooooom. He lives and works in Vancouver.

  • Poseur.

  • tyler b!

    doesn’t this go against the current concept(s) fueling the fix gear fascination?

    which is living simply and minimally, lowering the environmental impact?

    this is an honest question, not a rhetorical one.

  • Eco-friendly bling haha crazy

  • monika

    tyler: it DOES go against the original concepts fueling the fixie fascination, but i think it is an indicator of where those concepts got lost within to past year or so: the fixed appeal is now largely one of fashion, rather than of utility.

    anyway, goodness gracious me. i saw a similar (albeit more pedestrian) rig in the window of vozz last spring, confirming my suspicions that something of this level of extravagance was now a possibility.

  • hahah its just so ridiculous i can’t even comprehend it. i’m not surprised but maybe that’s worse.. the fact that i’m not surprised.

  • elise

    I’m happy with my purple and gold spray paint job on my fixie.

  • That is absolutely insane! Wire Damien Hirst’s diamond skull on the front and you’d have one killer ride! -B

  • Upon further thought, think I’ll hold out for the platinum/diamond version (vs this low-end gold/swarovski version)… -B

  • really? no gold chain? all that money and i don’t get a gold chain?

  • I wouldn’t be able to park this in any public places, as someone would probably steal it. It should come with a cheap, beaten-up cover or something.

  • Jolin

    thats messed, pretty pointless… hmm maybe kanye can ride it? http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2261/2119183410_7544f874b9.jpg

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  • ryan

    Already been done years ago. bmx wins.

  • for 100k you should at least get a cinelli supercorsa or something, not gold-plated 4130.

  • ….because they can! And I thought I was breaking the rules by building a fixie on a carbon frame from the 90s instead of a steel lugged beast from the 80s. But this takes it. 😉

  • Damn! Now that’s what I call a fixed gear bike. It even has a Brooks saddle. Those things might as well be made of solid gooooooold!

  • walter

    LOL. What an irony. The FAMs got a taste of their own medicine.

  • There goes Damien Hirst jumping on something else again, this fucking sucks.

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  • On Your Left

    thing is.. this shite is fake. Its Fuji Obey track bike stock, and powder coated.

    The frame and components are all lower end as far as craftsmanship (look at the ugly welds on the rear seat stays) and costs. The hubs are some of the cheapest you can find (Dimension branded). Even the Brooks saddle is the cheapest available.

    Don’t believe the hype.

  • Iwang

    NICE BIKE , Best of Best !!!

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  • gripmotoriker

    what about chain and bearings? that’s poor…

20.10.16 by Staff

Artist Spotlight: Joseph Minek


Cleveland, Ohio-based artist Joseph Minek experiments with traditional photographic processes to create images that resemble modernist abstract paintings. See more of Minek’s work below.

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20.10.16 by Staff

Exhibition: Evan Hecox’s “Northern” and Drew Leshko’s “Heaven is Whenever”


Amsterdam-based Andenken Gallery is hosting concurrent solo exhibitions of American artists Evan Hecox and Drew Leshko. “Northern” showcases Hecox’s ongoing series of paintings based on photos from his trip through Iceland and the Netherlands last year while Leshko’s “Heaven is Whenever” captures the transition and decay of urban life through dollhouse-scale sculptures made from wood and paper.

Check out more images below or on display at the Makerversity Amsterdam space from October 28 until November 14.

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20.10.16 by Jeff

Photographer Spotlight: Lluís Tudela


Photos by Lluís Tudela. More images below.

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20.10.16 by Jeff

Opinion: How to Email an Illustrator

We recently came across an article proposing the most efficient way to communicate with an illustrator, and it’s relevant for anyone looking to hire creatives of any discipline. Illustrator Kyle T. Webster wrote the article to act as “a guideline that will lead to improved communication, fewer revisions, better artwork, and fewer headaches for all involved”.
If you’re a freelance creative and have any thoughts to add, or you’re an art director with a counterpoint, we’d love to hear from you in the comments section below.

1. Your first email to an illustrator should not read: “Hey, are you available for an assignment?”
This kind of email is a waste of everybody’s time, because all of the important information is missing: size and number of illustrations, context, timeline, and budget. In order to reduce the back-and-forth between the individual assigning the art, and the illustrator, simply take a moment to include the important information in the initial email request.
For example: “Hello, John – we are publishing a story about the ongoing conflict between hedgehogs and walruses. We will need a cover, a full page, and two spot illustrations. The deadline for sketches is March 1st, and the finals will be due March 8th. Our budget is $3750. Are you available / interested in working with us on this assignment? Please let me know by 5pm today. Thank you.”
With one email, you have now given the artist all of the info needed for him/her to decide whether or not to accept the job. This used to be the standard introductory email for all assignments. I’m not sure what happened, but I, and many illustrators I know, rarely get emails like this any more. Let’s fix that.
2. Please do not expect illustrators to read minds.
Details are very important. When sending emails about your job, give as many relevant details as possible to an artist, if the assigned artwork has specific requirements. Illustrators are very capable of drawing anything you need, but we cannot guess what that might be if we are not told up front. For example, if you tell an illustrator to draw “a car on a street,” then the illustrator will assume the make and model of the car are not important. S/he will also assume the street can be any kind of street. Therefore, it is not fair to the artist to reject the final art because you expected a vintage Porsche on the Autobahn. Please be sure to communicate all required elements of the art in your earliest correspondence with your artist, and it will be smooth sailing for all.
Sometimes, very little direction is preferred, if the assignment calls for a lot of artistic freedom and interpretation. But, let us not confuse this with a lack of relevant information. For instance, the recent recipient of the Richard Gangel Art Director Award, SooJin Buzelli, is famous for giving her artists a lot of freedom. But let us note that when she assigns work, she actually has spent a good deal of time figuring out a way to distill a complex article down to its essential message or theme. She then sends this one or two sentence summary to a carefully selected illustrator, providing that individual with a perfect launchpad from which to create a unique visual solution. Concise and efficient.
3. Please write back. Please.
This is just common courtesy. I often get asked if I am available for an illustration and I then respond in the affirmative with some questions about the assignment or the budget or some other detail. Then, no reply ever comes. A week later, I will see another artist blog about completing the very same assignment that was initially emailed to me. While I understand that everybody is very busy, and emails are flying around at the speed of light, I urge you to please remember that it is unprofessional and quite rude to simply leave an artist hanging.
We often will put other things on hold or rework our weekly schedule to accommodate a project that we think is moving forward. A simple email to let us know that you will be working with somebody else, the job is cancelled, the issue is on hold, etc. is all we need to move on and stay on top of our other jobs. Thank you.

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20.10.16 by Jeff

Photographer Spotlight: Alexi Hobbs


Images by Montreal-based photographer Alexi Hobbs. More images below.

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