19.11.14 by Jeff

An Interview with Director Hiro Murai

I recently had a chat with Tokyo-born, Los Angeles-based director Hiro Murai who, especially in the recent months, has been nothing short of prolific. His videos for Flying Lotus and Chet Faker were two of my favourites this year, and were released on the heels of videos for Spoon and Shabazz Palaces. He just released his third video for Childish Gambino which featured an unexpected ending that got the Internet buzzing (something it seems he has a knack for). I’ve been a fan of his for quite a while so it was fun to get to ask him about his work.

I commissioned photographer Joyce Kim to shoot some images of Hiro for this piece and she did a beautiful job. Hope you enjoy it!

 

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Jeff Hamada: Is there any aspect to your work that you feel is particularly Japanese?

Hiro Murai: I didn’t used to think so, but I had a crazy moment of realization when I read the graphic novel, Understanding Comics, a couple years ago. There’s a whole section in the book about the difference between how Japanese manga and American comics are sequenced and paced, and I realized how much manga has influenced the way I build shots for a sequence.

JH: How old were you when you moved to the U.S. from Japan?

HM: I was 9 when I left Tokyo, so I spent a good chunk of my formative years reading manga so it makes sense, but it just never really occurred to me until then. I don’t think I’d do a good job of explaining it in words, but this is the kind of stuff I’m talking about (see here).hiro-murai00JH: I like the idea of leaving space for contemplation. I’ve been collecting all these Richard Scarry books from when I was a kid and when I think back to reading them, every page is full to the brim with drawings. I ordered this one called, Busy Busy World, off of ebay (so I could get the original politically incorrect version), and I opened it up, and the pages are all really empty. There was so much blank space, it was a really trippy moment, actually. I realized that my mind had filled in all these things that weren’t actually on the page. I feel like movies these days often leave nothing for the imagination. I recently watched a great one though, called Enemy, by Denis Villeneuve. It felt like something you’d make.

HM: That’s amazing! I love that. I’ve had similar experiences with cartoons I grew up watching too. Like, I’d swear there was a scene in a movie that didn’t actually exist. It’s amazing how much your mind fills things in, especially when you’re a kid. I forget who said this, and it might be one of those cliches that everyone says, but there’s a quote that goes something like “movies are just as much about what’s in the frame as what’s out.” I’ve always liked movies that are confident enough in their fiction that they don’t feel the need to show you everything. It leaves room for the viewer to engage, you know? I haven’t seen Enemy, but when we were prepping his video Flying Lotus told me that I’d like that movie too. I’m gonna have to check it out.

JH: Yeah do it, I think you’ll dig it.

 

 

Flying Lotus – “Never Catch Me” directed by Hiro Murai

 

 

JH: Maybe it’s because I met you and both Daniels at Kirsten Lepore’s Halloween party, but it really feels like your circle of friends are all insane directors ruling LA right now. How did this happen?

HM: Yeah, it’s pretty exciting to be surrounded by so many crazy talented people. I was a fan of a lot of my friends before I ever met them, which is bizarre but cool. I think it sort of naturally grew into a community because creators want to surround themselves with other creatively inspiring people, but also because freelance filmmaking can be a pretty lonely, chaotic endeavor without a support system. It’s comforting to know that your friends are living as recklessly as you are.

JH: That has to be the most important thing, surrounding yourself with people doing the wildest things all the time – like really going for it. So many of my friends now are actually living off of their passions that it feels normal. It feels like, of course you can live off the thing you love to do! But I remember coming out of art school really wondering if it was possible.

HM: Yeah man absolutely. When I see friends make things that feel like they wouldn’t exist otherwise, I get so excited, jealous, happy. It’s so stimulating and motivating creatively. I think about how it felt to be right out of school too. Looking back, I’m pretty impressed with how recklessly optimistic we all were. Or maybe at that point we’d already painted ourselves into a corner and had no other choice.

JH: Looking back on all the videos you’ve made so far, which one are you most proud of?

HM: I’m honestly proud of every video for different reasons (not to say there aren’t things that I also hate about some of them), but I’m still really proud of the very first video we did for Bloc Party’s “Signs”. The budget was something like $2,000, and the entire crew consisted of friends from film school doing me a huge favour.

 

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Hiro bought the bluer frog (Frog Delano Roosevelt) for the Earl Sweatshirt video shoot for the song “Chum” and became attached so he kept him.

 

JH: I was just in LA a couple months ago and it really feels like the place to be right now. All that tech money in San Fran is bumping up rent and all the artists are moving to your city. Do you feel it?

HM: Yeah, I know a lot of die hard New Yorkers who made the move too. I don’t really know why but things seem to be brewing over here. Although, the weird part about LA is that it’s so scattered and big that I never really feel like I can read the pulse of the whole city, so i could be totally wrong.

 

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Hiro eventually got a second frog, which he named Toady Roosevelt.

 

JH: Where’s you favourite spot in LA to go and think up new ideas?

HM: I really like driving aimlessly around town, especially at night. I feel like the simple task of driving distracts my mind enough that I can daydream freely. Maybe that sounds really irresponsible and dangerous. Do you have any favorite spots that you go during your visits? Always curious to see where people go in this city.

JH: I haven’t been to LA that much but I like being out in nature so I really enjoyed the trails around the Griffith Observatory. Actually, the observatory itself is a cool thinking spot. I’m sure you’ve seen it but that pendulum thing, when you first walk inside, blew my mind. It swings back and forth and it appears like it’s slowly rotating, and slowly knocking down these markers. But it’s actually stationary, and what you’re really seeing is the Earth rotating around it. I get so many ideas from things like that. I also hiked around Palos Verdes last time I was there.

HM: Oh yeah man. I love the Observatory. I remember the pendulum blew my mind when I went there for a field trip. I’ve been on a bit of a space kick recently after watching Cosmos.hiromurai99JH: I’ve always liked directors whose work is really different from one film to the next. Danny Boyle for instance, is probably most known for Slumdog and Trainspotting, but he also did that great kid’s movie Millions, and of course the sci-fi film Sunshine. Your resume sort of reads the same way: St. Vincent, David Guetta, Earl Sweatshirt, Queens of the Stone Age, Chet Faker, The Shins, Childish Gambino. How long do you have to do one thing well before people let you do whatever you want?

HM: I think a lot of that comes from the variety in the types music that I do videos for – and maybe my videos are more song-reliant than other directors’. I always feel like I’m putting visuals in support of the song, and not the other way around. Like I’m reverse scoring it or something. I think I’ve also been lucky with the artists I work with. Most of the people I’ve worked with in the past few years have been really trusting, so I haven’t really felt a lot of creative constraints. Nothing’s worse than having someone second guess your instincts before you get to see if it works for yourself.

 

 

Childish Gambino – “Sweatpants” directed by Hiro Murai

 

 

JH: I’ve always wanted to make a feature length rap action film in the style of Prince Paul’s “A Prince Among Thieves” video. I guess Belly was already essentially a really long Nas and DMX music video but I want it to be more like a musical. Anyways, I just saw the trailer for Tokyo Tribe directed by Shion Sono, and I guess I wasn’t the only one who had this dream. I feel like if anyone is going to do it right, it will be you.

HM: DUDE, I’ve never seen this Prince Paul video before. How did I miss this? That’s incredible. That movie looks insane too. I always really liked how Daniel Wolfe’s Plan B videos played out. They’re really gritty and cinematic, but peppered with fun theatrical elements like choreography.

 

 

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JH: Yeah I love Daniel Wolfe’s videos, I posted up all those Plan B videos. Was there a specific music video or film that made you want to make them yourself?

HM: I was always really into drawing growing up, so I feel like my initial interest in films came from animated films like Disney or Miyazaki movies. When I started making short films in high school I was also obsessed with the Coen brothers and Takeshi Kitano movies.

 

 

Chet Faker – “Gold” directed by Hiro Murai

 

 

JH: Is there someone you wanna shoutout right now, a director making cool work that more people need to know about?

HM: I’m not as up on new videos, directors, as I’d like to be, but my buddy Isaac Ravishankara just showed me the short film “Tangerine” by Dimitri Basil, that kind of blew my mind. I think the link was from Booooooom, actually. His Riptide video is great too.

JH: Yeah, his style is great. His video for Wunder Wunder (which I only just saw) is his best so far I think. It reminds me a lot of Alex Prager’s photos, but really funny, and it shows he can do more than just throw random elements in all over the place.

HM: Yeah! I thought Alex Prager too. Pretty fresh voice.

JH: What’s next for you?

HM: I’m taking a break for a little bit, but I’m looking for longer form projects at the moment. Hoping to do a few short films soon too. I’m saying that out loud now so I have to follow through with it.

JH: I do the same thing! I often tell people my favourite idea just so I have to actually work on it or be okay with someone else doing it before me.

 

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JH: Okay, I guess this is my final question. What has making all these films and videos in the last few years taught you about yourself?

HM: I feel like most of what I’ve learned about myself in my adult life has come from making and releasing stuff. When I was a kid all I did was daydream and draw, and that was always a very personal activity, but now those daydreams get to materialize through collaborations with the crew and elicit responses from viewers online. It’s bizarre but really interesting and rewarding. You learn a lot about yourself, positive and negative. (Sorry this is such a vague answer.)

 

 

Interview by Jeff Hamada
Photos by Joyce Kim

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Hiro Murai’s Website

Hiro Murai on Twitter

Hiro Murai on Instagram

17.11.14 by Jeff

Video of the Day: Charlie Chicken, Canine Artist

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Enjoyed this video featuring Charlie Chicken, a dog, poking a little fun at a lot of artist profile videos. Directed by Ed David. Watch the  below.

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06.11.14 by Jeff

Artist Profile: Mac Premo

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Really enjoyed this profile on Brooklyn-based artist Mac Premo, by filmmaker Bas Berkhout (the editing is terrific). Take a look at some images of Mac Premo’s work and watch the video below.

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26.08.14 by Jeff

Video Profile: Artist/Illustrator Wasted Rita

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The latest episode of the interview series “Like Knows Like” features Lisbon-based artist Rita Gomes aka Wasted Rita, whose image you’ve surely seen circulating Tumblr. She is hilarious and so honest. Watch the video profile below.

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05.08.14 by Jeff

Drawing On The Past: Katie So

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The submission period for our “Drawing On The Past” project is now closed! I am rounding up all the digital submissions (there’s tons), and will post a gallery of every single one. I am also going through the work that was mailed to me for the Vancouver show, and will make an announcement about that soon. Thanks to everyone who submitted to this project, it is incredible to look at it all. I can’t wait to show you.

This drawing above is by Vancouver-based artist Katie So. She wrote:

“In the past, I didn’t always have many friends. At times, I felt the world was too much for a little girl like me. Despite that, I always had my books. They invited me in when I wanted a place to stay, and provided distraction and inspiration when I needed it most. People and places change, but those pages stay the same. I hope my book collection never stops growing.”

 

Interview with Katie So

Jeff Hamada: Let’s start off by time-traveling back to high school (maybe this is a bad idea, I don’t know how you felt about high school). You get to re-write the blurb next to your graduation photo in the yearbook, go!

Katie So: That is such a tough one! I tracked down my yearbook and at the time I wrote: “I’d like to thank all the people who think they should be thanked and all those people who actually deserve it. Thank you.” So I guess I’ve always been terrible and bitter! Today, I’d probably write something like “I hope we all dress better 10 years from now.” Or some other grumpy, disgruntled comment like, “Your best friend will leave you for another man”, which is actually a true story that I’ve been turning into a comic for the past 2 years.

JH: My friend Cam’s nickname in high school was Snake, on the last day of school he wrote a message in my grade 12 yearbook that pretty much just said: “One day you will be playing with your son and you’ll suddenly feel a bite on your leg and see something slithering back into the bushes – Snake”. I think you two would have gotten along. Would you have any reservations about making that comic if it was obviously about your friend?

KS: Well, the comic is pretty dark. It’s about a girl who meets a friend while she’s venturing through these dark woods. It’s heavily symbolic, maybe too much so. The way things were left with my “best friend” and I, I don’t think she’d even notice if I released a book about us. It’s a very strange and sad story that I think contributes to a lot of what I struggle with today. It’s a slow process to get a long winded emotional relationship on paper, but I think it’s something people might like to see. It won’t have any words either, purely visual, which is a whole new challenge I’ve got to tackle. And if she does end up seeing it one day, the worst that could happen is she’ll only end up knowing how she made me feel.

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JH: If high-school-you made me a mix tape what would be on it?

KS: Side A would be all the Motown you can think of, Side B would be Zeppelin, obviously.

JH: What was the first comic that made you wanna make your own?

KS: That’s hard to pinpoint. When I was little, my mom showed me Asterix & Obelix and my dad introduced me to these Chinese comics called Old Master Q. I read all of those over and over, and Calvin and Hobbes was always a constant so I think the desire to add words to drawings probably stemmed from those books. In school, I usually found an excuse to do a comic for projects. I made one about kamikaze pilots that was pretty dark, now that I think about it.

JH: For whatever reason our library had Asterix comics but they were always in French (Tin Tin too), so I used to just look at the pictures.

KS: Yeah, I “read” a lot of the French ones too. I had a bunch of Dragon Ball comics too, that were only in Chinese but the drawings were so great, you didn’t need to know what was being said. Making up your own story is part of the fun anyway. Growing up, I had a lot of my mom’s old Swiss children’s books. Some of them I could read, and some of them I had separate story lines that I just made up for them. Maybe that’s why I like the idea of a story without words. Leave it up to the reader sometimes.

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JH: I know the “poor me” mentality in your comics is only semi-autobiographical but is it easier to share really personal things under the guise of self-loathing?

KS: I guess making fun of yourself is kind of a sick way to deal with your problems, but I know it’s something a lot of comedians and artists do. It’s a way to remove yourself from it so that you can point and laugh at yourself instead of seriously dealing with something painful.

JH: Is it a weird feeling when lots of people re-blog (and obviously really identify with) a fairly depressing observation about life?

KS: Yeah, it took my a while to realize that people were actually reading what I was putting out there. It’s interesting to see the response sometimes. I guess it goes with any art form; the reaction to a piece may not be what you intended which can be a good or a bad thing. I made the comics to make fun of myself, and to poke fun at the emotional trouble I have sometimes. The response I got was that people everywhere were feeling the same things, which surprised me. It’s pretty easy to feel isolated in the world today. That’s why I’ve been trying to do more positive comics. I didn’t like how a lot of my followers were in a state of wallowing with me, when what I was trying to do in the first place was say, “Hey! Wallowing is pathetic! You can indulge in feeling terrible for a bit, but now get up and point and laugh at how silly you looked when you were sad.” which of course is easier said than done.

JH: There is almost a Steven Wright quality to some of your writing; it’s so good. Are there any comedians that you’re inspired by?

 

 

KS: I think I was born with deadpan diction. I guess a lot of my writing has kind of a one-liner thing going on, but my favourite comedians are all really good story tellers, like Dave Chappelle, Louis CK and David Cross. They’re able to take you through this intricate story and make you forget where you started, only to bring it back to a punchline that comes out of nowhere. I’d like to experiment with long form jokes like that.
I do have a secret notebook with stand up jokes written in them. Maybe I can turn them into comics one day.

JH: I demand to hear one of these stand-up jokes!

KS: Well, I wrote this long winded one about Netflix and how after a few consecutive episodes of a tv show, it will ask you, “Are you still watching?”. I talk about how the “continue” button just serves as a reminder of how pathetic you are, and clicking it just confirms how depressing your life really is. You’re giving up. You’re offered the chance to rethink your life and make the right choice, and nobody ever does.
I can get annoyed at it judging me like that, but now I know, if no one else, at least Netflix is checking if I’m still alright. I mean, I could have choked to death from eating while lying down, between Futurama episodes, and they’d keep playing unless Netflix asked, “Hey, are you ok?”

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KS: 
The next level would be to connect a police scanner for paramedics that’s linked to people’s Netflix accounts, I’m sure that would save many lives or at least save people from finishing LOST.
 So, when I tuck myself in at night, all sad and alone, at least Netflix will check to see if I’m still breathing. This joke has almost certainly been done already, I’m sure of it.

JH: I’ve tried to eat soup lying down several times, like I mean, with my face actually sideways. It’s really tricky. What’s something that most people don’t know about you?

KS: This might destroy my persona, but I haven’t had that many real boyfriends. Also, my longest standing crush is Jay Baruchel, thanks to Popular Mechanics for Kids.

JH: This is very revealing information. Maybe we can end this with a really deep quote to enlighten everyone who reads this far?

KS: Ok. There’s something very powerful in witnessing or taking part in a special event, and not taking a picture of it.

 

Katie So’s Website

Katie So on Tumblr

 
 

30.07.14 by Jeff

Artist Profile: Jon Burgerman

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Enjoyed this little profile on Brooklyn-based British artist Jon Burgerman. Watch “The Color of Fun” below.

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09.07.14 by Jeff

Artist Profile: Alyssa Monks

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A beautifully shot portrait of Brooklyn-based artist Alyssa Monks, leaving the city to paint and reflect on her art practice. Watch the video below.

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30.06.14 by Jeff

“Drawing On The Past”: Interview with Director Andrew Thomas Huang

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My friends at Herschel Supply and I have launched an art project called “Drawing On The Past”, and we want you to draw a person, place, or thing, that’s had a positive impact on your life. It’s open to anyone to join, and I’d be thrilled if you took part! As a little extra incentive we’ll be giving away Herschel products to some random lucky people just for submitting to the project! Get the full instructions HERE.

This drawing above is a submission to our project by one of my favourite directors, Andrew Thomas Huang (I’ve featured his work many times).

He wrote: “This is one of the first creatures I invented when I was about 8 years old. It doesn’t have a name, but runs in the desert with the body of a kiwi, a honking nose and ram horns. This was special because it was one of the first characters that felt very real to me, and gave me confidence to keep drawing. This is my first re-imagining of the creature in 21 years.”

 

Interview with Andrew Thomas Huang

 

Jeff Hamada: Let’s start off with maybe the most important question of all, we get to eat one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner in L.A., where do we go?

Andrew Thomas Huang: Breakfast: Bea Bea’s in Burbank – hands down best french toast on Earth. No joke. Lunch: Larchmont Wine & Cheese sandwich shop. Dinner: Korean BBQ place in Koreatown called Soot Bull Jeep.

 

 

JH: I was trying to explain to someone the unique look that has sorta become your signature. You’re able to use computer generated images but have them still feel very tactile, very real. Is it fair to call this your style? Do you feel like you’re speaking with your own voice now?

ATH: I’m very cautious not to pin myself to a particular style, as that can stagnate a director’s career very quickly. Though I suppose I have married myself to certain ideas and philosophies about how I want things to move in my films, and I am more interested in advancing various thematic threads in my work but with different techniques, including more straight live action as well. Short answer is yes, I am speaking with my own voice now but that voice is constantly changing as I change.

JH: Did J.J. Abrams want you to come work for him right out of school?

ATH: He encouraged me to direct and welcomed me to become part of the Bad Robot family, which involved pitching to him and/or working as a PA at the company. This was back in 2007.

JH:  I read that it was your short film Doll Face that got him (and many people on the Internet) excited about your work. Will we see any long form work any time soon or are you still mostly interested in shorts?

ATH: Long form work yes, but not any time soon. I am booked some big jobs for the next year which are very exciting but still in short form world. I am currently outlining a feature which is more of a long term project.

JH: I’m guessing a lot of these big jobs will be secret at this point, but is there anything you’ve already been working on that we should look out for in the future?

ATH: For 2 years now I’ve been meaning to make a sort of sequel to my short film Solipsist, but something much darker and metallic. I’m done with colorful psychedelic rocks and sandy stuff. That project will realistically take another two years, but I have some other exciting stuff brewing that unfortunately I have to keep quiet about, but I’ll just say keep an eye out for March 2015.

 

 

JH: Solipsist was actually the first thing I’d seen of yours and it blew my mind. I’d love to see a sequel. Who are some other filmmakers that people should be watching that are perhaps flying a little under the radar?

ATH: (Some not necessarily under the radar, but I am just a huge fan of these artists) Kahlil Joseph, Michael Langan, Mikey Please, Aoife McArdle, Julie Faure-Brac, Geoffrey Lillemon, Lucy McRae, Jon Rafman.

JH: Never seen Julie Faure-Brac’s work before! Very cool. I usually end interviews by asking what’s one thing you’d like to accomplish this year? And also, what’s something you’d like to accomplish in your lifetime?

ATH: I hope to actually begin shooting (or be ready to shoot) my next short film by end of the year. Lifetime – I want to direct the next Dark Crystal.

 

Andrew Thomas Huang’s Website

Andrew Thomas Huang on Twitter

 

If you would like to participate in the “Drawing On The Past” project it’s open to anyone and we’d love to have you. Full project instructions HERE.

We are releasing our very limited edition Herschel Supply and Booooooom bag to the public on July 7th at 9am. It will be for sale online HERE.