23.05.17 by Jeff

Kutcorners for OURO Collective

OURO Collective – photo by Teppei Tanabe

 

This week Vancouver-based dance collective OURO is debuting their first full-length show “Tangent” at the Orpheum’s Annex theatre (May 25th/26th), and we are proud to be a media partner for the event. If you’re looking for some creative inspiration come check this out, we’ll be at both shows! Tickets are going quick, so if you’re interested get tickets HERE!

Yesterday we shared a clip of OURO’s rehearsal footage (watch here) and today we have an interview with Kutcorners, who created three original tracks for “Tangent”. The New Zealand-born, Vancouver-based producer is one half of LIVE EVIL, the guys that made all those amazing live mixes we featured over the years (watch one here). You can stream or download the music Kutcorners created for OURO on Spotify, iTunes, and Bandcamp.

 

Vancouver producer, Kutcorners – photo by Hana Pesut

 

Jeff Hamada: How would you describe the music you make?

Kutcorners: This is always a hard question, because I actually like to make many different types of music. But ultimately things under “Kutcorners” usually are a derivative of R&B music, old or new, with a twist.

I sometimes say I make “pop” music, but my music isn’t really that popular in the traditional sense. More like “pop art” really.

Jeff Hamada: I like the idea that it’s pop art. Who are some of the artists influencing you right now?

Kutcorners: Mura Masa, Toro Y Moi or Les Sins, Caribou, Dj Dahi, Knxwledge, Pomo, Kaytranada, U-Tern (Oliver), Nosaj Thing, Prince and MJ will inspire me forever.

 

If you don’t have Spotify you can listen to the tracks here.

 

Jeff Hamada: Had you ever collaborated with dancers prior to this project with OURO?

Kutcorners: No, this is the first time and I hope to do more of it.

Jeff Hamada: That would be cool to see an on-going thing. How would you describe the work that they’re creating?

Kutcorners: I would describe it as a melange of disciplines coming together to form a modern take on traditional dance performance. It’s very refreshing and inspiring work.

Jeff Hamada: Can you talk a little bit about the experience of watching their rehearsals and then turning that into sounds?

Kutcorners: Well, we talked a lot about sounds they like when they rehearse, which gave me inspiration to draw from an idea I had started already, and also on some new arrangements.

Getting people to describe sounds they like can be quite hard, because people hear sounds and articulate them differently from person to person. It’s fun to hear how we all describe the sounds we like and how they affect movement.

 

 

Jeff Hamada: Did this experience offer any sort of new perspective on your work?

Kutcorners: Yeah, it showed me that I make movements in music too quick! It’s more effective to use little sounds and build things slowly rather than to cram everything in to a 3-minute song.

Dance is very much related to how music works and why it’s made. In retrospect, I would have benefitted from dancing more in my life. It really helps connect you to the physical side of music, which is so important when creating it.

Jeff Hamada: What things are you working on now?

Kutcorners: I’m working on making more original music for my own releases, which I plan to put out on record and online. Working with singers too, to help bring these instrumentals to life.

 

Kutcorners on Bandcamp

Kutcorners on Soundcloud

Kutcorners on Instagram

OURO Collective Website

OURO Collective on Instagram

01.05.17 by Jeff

Podcast of the Day: We Eat Art

I’m always on the hunt for good art-related podcasts and We Eat Art is a great one. Hosts John Mejias (New York) and Zak Smith (Los Angeles) make it seem easy, but interesting interviews are not as simple as putting a mic in front of someone who makes interesting artwork. These two obviously do their research and ask really great questions. I’ve only listened to a couple episodes so far, but I’m definitely gonna check out some more (upcoming episodes will feature Mike Giant and James Jean among others).

Check out the episode with Texas-born, New York-based artist Sean McCarthy (who was Zak’s roommate for six years) and see more of his paintings below. There’s some bad language so if that bothers you maybe skip this one.

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06.10.16 by Jeff

Interview: Sougwen Chung

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We’ve featured our friend Canadian-born, New York-based artist Sougwen Chung on the site several times in the past, from drawings and projection-mapped installations to her more recent experiments merging art, performance and technology.

I had a chance to catch up with Sougwen ahead of Ableton’s Loop event, where she’ll be speaking next month. More images and full interview below!

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16.09.16 by Staff

Giveaway: Tom Gauld’s Mooncop

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London-based illustrator and cartoonist Tom Gauld probably doesn’t need an introduction. His work has appeared in outlets like The New Yorker, The Believer and The New York Times. He’s also been doing a weekly series of comics for The Guardian’s Saturday Review since 2005 — a collection of which became his second comic book, You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack (2013).

His latest masterpiece, Mooncop, is similar in tone to his first graphic novel, Goliath (2012) — a deadpan retelling of the Bible story. Set in a future where the idea of living on the moon isn’t just a possibility but a reality so passé that the one remaining policeman has little to do other than watch the last few colonists move back to Earth, Mooncop brilliantly side-steps obvious drama, focusing instead on things that are far more mundane and all too relatable.

Mooncop hits stores September 20th! Thanks to our friends over at Drawn & Quarterly, we have two copies to give away! They also put us in touch with Tom, who was kind enough to tell us a bit about his process, how he stays motivated and what had him laughing so hard he had to stop drawing! Check out the full interview below and share your favourite book or movie set in space in the comments for your chance to win!

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16.07.16 by Jeff

An Interview with Artist Daniel Rozin

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Daniel Rozin is an Associate Art Professor at ITP Tisch School of the Arts, NYU, and as an artist he is perhaps best known for his ongoing series of ‘mechanical mirrors’. I’ve been fascinated by his work for several years now so it was a treat to get to ask him some questions about the things he makes. Have a look at a video of some of his works as well as a short interview below.

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25.02.16 by Staff

Video Premiere of Junior Boys’ “Big Black Coat” and Interview with Director Timothy Saccenti

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Junior Boys have just released the video for their latest track, directed by New York-based visionary Timothy Saccenti! Check out “Big Black Coat”, plus our interview with Saccenti, over at Booooooom TV!

11.02.16 by Staff

Photographer Profile: Zun Lee

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Another fantastic profile in the InFrame series. This instalment focuses on Zun Lee who initially took up photography as a hobby and escape from the stresses of his corporate job only to start taking pictures of strangers on the street, uncovering a whole new way of connecting with people. Watch the full video on Booooooom TV.

15.01.16 by Jeff

Director Alejandro G. Inarritu Breaks Down a Sequence from The Revenant

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One of my favourite video channels is the New York Times series Anatomy of a Scene, in which directors narrate a sequence of their film. In this episode director Alejandro G. Inarritu discusses making the viewers feel trapped. Watch it over on Booooooom TV.